IIT Madras Screenwriting Workshop from 7-14 June 2014. Application Form


 

APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED   May 13, 2014

 

Celebrity speakers:

Bijoy Nambiar is the director of Shaitan and David. He is currently producing a Hindi film, Pizza

Ram (director National Award winning  Thanga Meengal  )

Shridhar Raghavan  (screenwriter  Khakee, Bluffmaster, Dum maro Dum, winner of National award  for co writing Apaharan,co writer forthcoming film starring Ajith with Gautham Menon as director)

Shama Zaidi (Her credits include works on Umrao Jaan, Trikaal, Bharat Ek Khoj, Mandi, and Satyajit Ray’s Shatranj ke Khiladi. Currently, she is working on Samvidhaan: The Making of the Constitution of India )

Vikramaditya Motwane (director Udaan, Lootera)

      AND

Rana Daggubati

Schedule for Workshop on Cinematic Script Writing


Schedule for Workshop on Cinematic Script Writing

 

Course will be taught by experienced faculty.

Special interactive sessions will be conducted by film industry personalities:

 

Celebrity speakers for interactive sessions:

Bijoy Nambiar is the director of Shaitan and David. He is currently producing a Hindi film, Pizza

Ram (director of National Award winning  Thanga Meengal  )

Shridhar Raghavan  (screenwriter  Khakee, Bluffmaster, Dum maro Dum,winner of National award  for co writing Apaharan, co writer forthcoming film starring Ajith with Gautham Menon as director)

Shama Zaidi (Her credits include works on Umrao Jaan, Trikaal, Bharat Ek Khoj, Mandi, and Satyajit Ray’s Shatranj ke Khiladi. Currently, she is working on Samvidhaan: The Making of the Constitution of India )

Vikramaditya Motwane (Director Udaan, Lootera)

AND

Rana Daggubati 

o   Basic Elements of Screen Language: Creation and Consumption

o   Nature of Cinematic language, Real life event and Cinematic event

o   Audio-Visual Spatio-temporal Narrative

o   Film-making Process: Idea to Screen

o   Creative Conceptualization: What is Script? The Method and Process

o   Synopsis: Idea, Purpose, Orientation

o   Just Write! – Upending the Process of Writing: Exercise 1#

o   Treatment Development: Unity of Theme, Credibility of Internal Logic, Point of View, generating Depth and Meaning to the Concept.

o   Transitioning from Words to Audio-Visuals

o   Moving Image Grammar: Questions of Space and Time in your Story

o   Object and Space: Body and Background

o   The Fourth Dimension: Time – Real Time, Synthetic Time: Exercise 2 #

o   Story with reference to Event Order

o   Visualization: Decisions regarding Values of Space-Time

o   Scene Construction: Screen Space – Location, Screen Time – Time of Event and other temporal considerations

o   Dramatic Construction: Structure, Length, Form – Genre, Style

o   Inductive and Deductive Approaches

o   Characters, Characterization and Characteristics –Motive, Intention, Goal

o   Main Characters, Supporting Characters – Function, Category, Type, Background and History


IIT Madras is presenting Imaging Cinema 2014, a
Screenwriting  Workshop from 7-14 June. The focus is on
various aspects of screenwriting. Sessions on screenwriting will be
conducted by experienced resource persons. Special sessions on aspects
of direction and screenwriting will be conducted by established names
from Mumbai and South Indian cine industries (including directors,
screenwriters, cinematographers, and actors). The course outline will
soon be available on our website.

Those interested in participating can fill in the completed
application form available at: http://www.imagingcinema.wordpress.com.
Also,at: http://www.imagingcinema.com. Last date of applying is 11 May 2014.

Details of fee structure:

· Rs 7000/ for all participants

· Rs 6000/ for former participants (those who attended our
previous events) and students, who are still pursuing their degree;

· Rs 8000/ for NRIs & Foreign Nationals.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to produce a
screenplay under the guidance of the mentors. They will be awarded
with an IIT Madras certificate of participation. The workshop will be
held on IITM campus and is organized by Dr Aysha Iqbal Viswamohan,
Associate Professor, Dept of Humanities & Social Sciences, IIT Madras.

For further details, contact: 91 74185 62000

IIT Madras has become a well-known centre for highly popular film
workshops. In May 2009 the institute hosted the Chennai International
Screenwriting Workshop which was organized under the auspices of Padma
Bhushan Dr Kamal Haasan’s Rajkamal Studio. This 5 days Workshop
included sessions by Shri K Balachander, Shekhar Kapoor, Rakeysh
Omprakash Mehra, Sriram Raghavan, Atul Tiwari, and Anjum Rajabali.

This was followed by a spate of successful events including a 6 day
screenwriting cum conclave on filmmaking in 2010 , which had Dibakar
Banerjee, K Balachander, RBalki, Santosh Sivan, PC Sreeram, Jaideep
Sahni, Shimit Amin, Nagesh Kukunoor, Saurabh Shukla, editor Sreekar
Prasad, and Tamil film directors Vishnuvardhan and CS Amudhan.

In 2012, a 10 day filmmaking workshop was organized where faculty
members from FTII, Pune and LV Prasad Institute, Chennai conducted
sessions on various aspects of filmmaking such as screenwriting,
direction, cinematography, editing, sound and set designing.
Participants produced a 3- 5 minute feature at the end of the
workshop. Celebrity speakers included Rohan Sippy, Anurag Kashyap,
Sriram & Sridhar Raghavan, Habib Faisel, Ravi K Chandran, Tamil
directors Vetrimaaran and Kumarrajan Thiagarajan and writers Subha and
Bala.

For viewing some of the short films made by participants in 2012 ,
see our website: http://www.imagingingcinema.com

The uniqueness of these workshops lie in their outreach where
candidates from a cross section of society interact with established
names from the Indian film industry. Many of our previous attendees
have gone on to make a mark for them in film and media industry, and
are currently in the process of making and screenwriting for films or
assisting filmmakers of repute.

application form screenwriting course 2014

Schedule for Workshop on Cinematic Script Writing

 

Course will be taught by experienced faculty.

Special interactive sessions will be conducted by film industry personalities:

 o   Basic Elements of Screen Language: Creation and Consumption

o   Nature of Cinematic language, Real life event and Cinematic event

o   Audio-Visual Spatio-temporal Narrative

o   Film-making Process: Idea to Screen

o   Creative Conceptualization: What is Script? The Method and Process

o   Synopsis: Idea, Purpose, Orientation

o   Just Write! – Upending the Process of Writing: Exercise 1#

o   Treatment Development: Unity of Theme, Credibility of Internal Logic, Point of View, generating Depth and Meaning to the Concept.

o   Transitioning from Words to Audio-Visuals

o   Moving Image Grammar: Questions of Space and Time in your Story

o   Object and Space: Body and Background

o   The Fourth Dimension: Time – Real Time, Synthetic Time: Exercise 2 #

o   Story with reference to Event Order

o   Visualization: Decisions regarding Values of Space-Time

o   Scene Construction: Screen Space – Location, Screen Time – Time of Event and other temporal considerations

o   Dramatic Construction: Structure, Length, Form – Genre, Style

o   Inductive and Deductive Approaches

o   Characters, Characterization and Characteristics –Motive, Intention, Goal

o   Main Characters, Supporting Characters – Function, Category, Type, Background and History

Richard Linklater: A Recurring Dream About Life


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Starting with the early 1980s the American movie industry saw the rise of the blockbusters and film franchises. This was spurred on by the success and pop culture cult following of the Star Wars and an exponential advancement in the technology that goes into film production, thanks to the pioneering work of Geroge Lucas. Starting with E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), and the last two episodes of the Star wars the decade saw the starting of the Indiana Jones series and the Back to the future trilogy. Richard Linklater breezed in with his Slacke(1991) ,to such an arena, rife with a cacophony of technology, fantastic plots and exotic settings. Along with Steven Soderberg’s Sex Lies and Videotape(1989), Slacker paved the way for the American Indie film movement of the later 1990s.
Richard Linklater has consciously positioned himself outside of the formulaic narratives and the big-budget block busters of Holywood . Slacker portrays Austin’s raw suburban life, filled with conspiracy theorists, pop culture enthusiasts, misfits and weirdos who wade in and out of the story. We follow each of their conversations and drift on to the next one. Linklater sets a thematic precedent in Slacker, with its loose narrative, bound together by conversations and a sense of temporality. The characters engage with their existence, about what it means to exist or to be here and now, in a very temporal sense and through them or along with them the viewer is confronted with the temporality of their own existence. The film plays out, more or so in real time, with the characters going about their daily routines or life. Linklater places his characters , within the routine of a normal day and they come out as quirky as they are original. In his first attempt at a feature film, It’s Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books(1988) Linklater follows the narrator (himself) going around the country, meeting acquaintances and engaging in conversations with them when not going about his daily routines. There are moments that stand out among this ordinariness: Linklater pointing his gun out of the window, looking at his hands in the sunlight, standing before a mountain range with his friend, watching Dreyer’s Gertrud on television. None of these moments are given explicit meaning within the context of a narrative. Linklater and his gun are not a part of a sinister plot. When he looks at his hand in the sunlight, it is not a turning point in the story. They are simply moments. Life as it unfolds and characters who flow with it; with conversations about their present which would only make sense later.
In narrative filmmaking, the presentation of time is more complex, because it is also a re-presentation of time in a fictional context. The artifice of aging has always been a part of filmmaking, whether through makeup, special effects, multiple actors and/or acting itself. Beyond this artifice, however, lie characters – the actors themselves – who’ve aged with us in actual time. More often than not this aging is merely a by-product of a profitable franchise churning out sequel after sequel. But there are franchises that do necessarily unfold in time, like the Harry Potter series, which for many felt poignant not only because of its sweeping plot but because they were actually witnessing these characters getting older. Outside of these mega franchises, there are film sequels in which the actual passing of time plays a crucial role, not as a mere by-product but as a key ingredient. The goal is not to produce the next film as soon as possible but to wait for enough time to pass so the actors can age along with their characters. What comes to mind most immediately are the five films of François Truffaut that track the ongoing life of Antoine Doinel over the course of 20 years. The changing face and body of Jean-Pierre Léaud as Antoine are a significant part of this narrative experience. We are not only witnessing the story of an abandoned boy struggling to become an adult, but time itself. Closing his Before series with Before Midnight(2013), Richard Linklater joins Truffaut in offering this rare kind of cinema in which the physicality of time confronts our own existence. What makes Linklater’s narrative unique is that his two main characters, Jesse and Celine, have always been mindful of time passing, even when we first meet them in their twenties, and remain mindful in their forties. This is part of what draws them together – their willingness, or even eagerness, to discuss such things. Linklater unapologetically allows his characters, not only in these films but in his others, to engage with what it means to exist in this world. Although Linklater’s filmography is cross-genre and defies any particular category, his cinema is filled with characters who question, theorise and reflect.
For Linklater, the unfolding of life is worthy of conversation and representation. In Before Sunrise , Jesse describes to Celine an idea for a 24/7 cable access television show that would capture “life as it’s lived… a guy waking up in the morning and taking the long shower, eating a little breakfast, making a little coffee and reading the paper.” “Wait, wait,” Celine responds. “All those mundane, boring things everybody has to do every day of their fucking life?” Jesse: “I was going to say the poetry of day-to-day life…”
He comes up with an animated philosophical musing on life and the nature of reality in Waking Life (2001) and then follows it up with a musical comedy about the spirit of Rock and Roll in the School of Rock(2003) and goes on to make a Science fiction film about a dystopian future with a surveillance state at war with drugs in A Scanner Darkly(2006). His narrative remains loose and open even while examining the health risks involved in the fast food industry and its environmental and social consequences in the Fast food nation(2006). The story is not gripping with exciting moments of suspense and suspensions of disbelief, but it is filled with events and characters picked up from the windy and arid landscape of Colorado. Thematically and stylistically, Dazed and Confused(1993) and suburbia(1996) are very similar to Slacker. While Dazed and Confused is about a bunch of high school kids in their last days of school, suburbia tells the story of teenagers (they are not kids anymore) who are out of college and who have hit their first road blocks of adult life. They cling on to their high school ways of life, reluctant to take initiative and move on, hunched around coffee cups bickering and making efforts to humiliate each other though they have none but each other for themselves. They are characters with whom one can deeply sympathize. Here, Linklater does not bother about resolutions of all conflicts, and happy endings. SubUrbia is too honest and too painful in its closer to life portrayal of young adult life.
His cinema is about characters who are constantly engaged with but not embedded to their surroundings. Slacker is widely regarded as a signature movie about Generation X,the drifters and the quasi intellectuals, discussing Madonna, neighbourhood gigs , Freud and Bo Dylan. In spirit it is more about being a ‘loose’ person in your twenties, without any binding attachments, with enough time to reflect, ponder and redefine yourself and your relation to the world. One can see the same sentiment reflected throughout his cinema. The Jack Black character in School of Rock who is naïvely trying to work things out as a musician as opposed to his blue collar room mate who has given up his musician life. The two sets of teenagers in Fast Food Nation, the ‘white’ American high school kids, who discuss about doing something meaningful about their life and are wannabe activists as opposed to the Mexican teenagers who have to take up jobs and work through their day to make both ends meet . In Waking Life, Linklater makes his most profound and direct statement about waking up to the reality of our condition. The loose structure is similar to Slacker and Dazed and Confused. A single guy wanders about, bumping into various philosophers, revolutionaries, artists, and kooks, and listening to their rants and rhapsodies. But the world of Waking Life is the world of lucid dreams, a world that he can’t escape from. Riding his eyes and ears, we are overwhelmed with information and meditations concerning consciousness, language, love, dreams, the future, free will, film, and the explosive poetry of being. If all those verbal wonders weren’t enough, the film is also marvelously animated, using a technique of digital Rotoscoping that “paints” over digital video images, lending the animation the shimmering, hauntingly familiar quality of old memories or dreams.
His period film, Me and Orsen Welles(2008), unfolds as a backstage love story to Orsen Welle’s stage adaptation of Julius Caessar. “I’ve never seen a backstage movie that was truer to the experience of putting on a show,” wrote Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout, who reserved special praise for the design team’s recreation of Welles’ production of Julius Caesar. “Like most Welles stage shows, alas, this one left few traces,” Teachout wrote. “No part of the production was filmed, and nothing else survives but the design sketches and some still photographs taken in 1937. … What makes Me and Orson Welles uniquely interesting to scholars of American drama is that Mr. Linklater’s design team found the Gaiety Theatre on the Isle of Man. This house closely resembles the old Comedy Theatre on 41st Street, which was torn down five years after Julius Caesar opened there. Using Samuel Leve’s original designs, they reconstructed the set for Julius Caesar on the Gaiety’s stage. Then Mr. Linklater filmed some 15 minutes’ worth of scenes from the play, lit according to Jean Rosenthal’s plot, accompanied by Marc Blitzstein’s original incidental music and staged in a style as close to that of the 1937 production as is now possible.” In setting up a closer to life depiction of the backstage occurings, Linklater is trying to get closer to life as it happens, in the details that are missed but remains on screen and around us in life as it happens.
This value that Linklater sees in the ordinariness of life unfolding makes his films all the more delicate. He is aware of life’s temporality, of the characters’ temporality, of our own temporality. He is willing to converse about these things, about things that matter. Their verbose narrative is about externalizing these interior monologues. In doing so he is rarely coy or apathetic. If we are admonished to write what we know, it is not surprising that Linklater writes about people who are concerned but find pleasure and connection in the discussion of their concerns. Linklater is engaged in a conversation with cinema through his cinema. As mentioned earlier, his films may not have a signature shot or a technique or theme, rather , they are conversations, between his characters, between the film maker and the audience and between the film maker and the cinema.